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ESSD | Articles | Volume 10, issue 3
Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 10, 1207–1216, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-10-1207-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Special issue: Hydrometeorological data from mountain and alpine research...

Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 10, 1207–1216, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-10-1207-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Peer-reviewed comment 02 Jul 2018

Peer-reviewed comment | 02 Jul 2018

Eleven years of mountain weather, snow, soil moisture and streamflow data from the rain–snow transition zone – the Johnston Draw catchment, Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed and Critical Zone Observatory, USA

Sarah E. Godsey et al.
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Short summary
Weather data in mountainous rain-to-snow transition zones are limited, but are vital for water resources. We present a 10-year dataset for this zone that includes hourly temperatures, relative humidity, streamflow, snow depth, precipitation, wind speed/direction, solar energy, and soil moisture at 11 stations. Average air temperatures are near freezing 8 months each year, so that slight warming may determine whether rain falls instead of snow, affecting water supplies and fire risk.
Weather data in mountainous rain-to-snow transition zones are limited, but are vital for water...
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