Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 8.792 IF 8.792
  • IF 5-year value: 8.414 IF 5-year 8.414
  • CiteScore value: 8.18 CiteScore 8.18
  • SNIP value: 2.620 SNIP 2.620
  • SJR value: 4.885 SJR 4.885
  • IPP value: 7.67 IPP 7.67
  • h5-index value: 28 h5-index 28
  • Scimago H index value: 24 Scimago H index 24
Volume 10, issue 4 | Copyright

Special issue: Hydrometeorological data from mountain and alpine research...

Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 10, 1795-1805, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-10-1795-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  09 Oct 2018

09 Oct 2018

Spatially distributed water-balance and meteorological data from the rain–snow transition, southern Sierra Nevada, California

Roger Bales1, Erin Stacy1, Mohammad Safeeq1, Xiande Meng1, Matthew Meadows1,a, Carlos Oroza2, Martha Conklin1, Steven Glaser2, and Joseph Wagenbrenner3 Roger Bales et al.
  • 1Sierra Nevada Research Institute, University of California, Merced, California, USA
  • 2Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California, USA
  • 3USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station, Arcata, California, USA
  • anow at: Kings River Watershed Association, Fresno, California, USA

Abstract. We strategically placed spatially distributed sensors to provide representative measures of changes in snowpack and subsurface water storage, plus the fluxes affecting these stores, in a set of nested headwater catchments. The high temporal frequency and distributed coverage make the resulting data appropriate for process studies of snow accumulation and melt, infiltration, evapotranspiration, catchment water balance, (bio)geochemistry, and other critical-zone processes. We present 8 years of hourly snow-depth, soil-moisture, and soil-temperature data, as well as 14 years of quarter-hourly streamflow and meteorological data that detail water-balance processes at Providence Creek, the upper part of which is at the current 50% rain versus snow transition of the southern Sierra Nevada, California. Providence Creek is the long-term study cooperatively run by the Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory (SSCZO) and the USDA Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station's Kings River Experimental Watersheds (KREW). The 4.6km2 montane Providence Creek catchment spans the current lower rain–snow transition elevation of 1500–2100m. Two meteorological stations bracket the high and low elevations of the catchment, measuring air temperature, relative humidity, solar radiation, precipitation, wind speed and direction, and snow depth, and at the higher station, snow water equivalent. Paired flumes at three subcatchments and a V-notch weir at the integrating catchment measure quarter-hourly streamflow. Measurements of meteorological and streamflow data began in 2002. Between 2008 and 2010, 50 sensor nodes were added to measure distributed snow depth, air temperature, soil temperature, and soil moisture within the top 1m below the surface. These sensor nodes were installed to capture the lateral differences of aspect and canopy coverage. Data are available at hourly and daily intervals by water year (1 October–30 September) in nonproprietary formats from online data repositories. Data for the Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory distributed snow and soil datasets are at https://doi.org/10.6071/Z7WC73. Kings River Experimental Watersheds meteorological data are available from https://doi.org/10.2737/RDS-2018-0028 and stream-discharge data are available from https://doi.org/10.2737/RDS-2017-0037.

Special issue
Download
Short summary
Strategically placed, spatially distributed sensors provide representative measures of changes in snowpack and subsurface water storage, plus the fluxes affecting these stores, in a set of nested headwater catchments. We present 8 years of hourly snow-depth, soil-moisture, and soil-temperature data from hundreds of sensors, as well as 14 years of streamflow and meteorological data that detail processes at the rain–snow transition at Providence Creek in the southern Sierra Nevada, California.
Strategically placed, spatially distributed sensors provide representative measures of changes...
Citation
Share