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ESSD | Articles | Volume 11, issue 2
Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 11, 473–492, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-11-473-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 11, 473–492, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-11-473-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  11 Apr 2019

11 Apr 2019

Revised records of atmospheric trace gases CO2, CH4, N2O, and δ13C-CO2 over the last 2000 years from Law Dome, Antarctica

Mauro Rubino et al.
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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Mauro Rubino on behalf of the Authors (12 Mar 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (24 Mar 2019) by Thomas Blunier
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Short summary
The scientific community uses numerical models to predict future atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases causing global warming. This study presents the history of atmospheric concentration of the major greenhouse gases over the last 2000 years measured in ice core bubbles from the site of Law Dome (East Antarctica). The associated dataset is useful to test climate models and help provide accurate predictions of future climate change.
The scientific community uses numerical models to predict future atmospheric levels of...
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