Journal cover Journal topic
Earth System Science Data The Data Publishing Journal
Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 8, 159-164, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-8-159-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Review article
22 Apr 2016
Surface radiation during the total solar eclipse over Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard, on 20 March 2015
Marion Maturilli and Christoph Ritter Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, Potsdam, 14473, Germany
Abstract. On 20 March 2015, a total solar eclipse occurred over Ny-Ålesund (78.9° N, 11.9° E), Svalbard, in the high Arctic. It was the first time that the surface radiation components during the totality of a solar eclipse were measured by a Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) station. With the Ny-Ålesund long-term radiation data set as background (available at doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.150000), we present here the peculiarities of the radiation components and basic meteorology observed during the eclipse event. The supplementary data set contains the basic BSRN radiation and surface meteorological data in 1 min resolution for March 2015, and is available at doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.854326. The eclipse radiation data will be a useful auxiliary data set for further studies on micrometeorological surface–atmosphere exchange processes in the Svalbard environment, and may serve as a test case for radiative transfer studies.

Citation: Maturilli, M. and Ritter, C.: Surface radiation during the total solar eclipse over Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard, on 20 March 2015, Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 8, 159-164, https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-8-159-2016, 2016.
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Short summary
The total solar eclipse over Ny-Ålesund (78.9° N, 11.9° E), Svalbard, on 20 March 2015 has been followed by various sensors. Here, we present the surface radiation measurements in the context of the meteorological observations, providing basic data for further studies on e.g. radiative transfer or micrometeorology.
The total solar eclipse over Ny-Ålesund (78.9° N, 11.9° E), Svalbard, on 20 March 2015...
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